Yesterday’s Thoughts

June 27, 2005

Rick Santorum – Half Right Again

The blogsphere is like a nuclear reactor. Every so often some topic will launch a chain reaction, this reaction will achieve criticality and the whole thing will go nuclear.

The latest victim is Rick Santorum, a perennial favorite, who I have defended before. Last Friday in the Philadelphia Daily News John Baer referred to a several year old opinion piece in Catholic Online.

One paragraph is causing all the buzz, the subject is priest child abuse.

It is startling that those in the media and academia appear most disturbed by this aberrant behavior, since they have zealously promoted moral relativism by sanctioning “private” moral matters such as alternative lifestyles. Priests, like all of us, are affected by culture. When the culture is sick, every element in it becomes infected. While it is no excuse for this scandal, it is no surprise that Boston, a seat of academic, political and cultural liberalism in America, lies at the center of the storm.


The Daily News mention was picked up, and a link added, by Capitol Buzz here. It came to my attention almost simultaneously from Shakespeare’s Sister, Atrios, Kevin Drum and Josh Marshall.

I don’t need to comment on the responses. They are about what you would expect – principled denunciations of the slander, and comments on Santorum’s sanity, integrity and refusal to take responsibility.

Those are all good points, but they miss the ammunition contained in the quote. Santorum gives away all, “Priests, like all of us, are affected by culture. When the culture is sick, every element in it becomes infected.”

Santorum is correct on the values argument, “When the culture is sick, every element in it becomes infected.” He just points in the wrong direction.

The priest’s culture believes that the supreme being in the universe choose to create a world that required the sacrificial death of his own son. The priest believes that the supreme being choose this knowing, for certain, the outcome. The priest believes that the supreme being’s reason for electing to creating the world that would require this sacrifice was personal glorification. This is their core belief of their faith, their religion and their culture.

Given the core beliefs of their culture, is it any wonder that the priest, “Father,” would consider it acceptable to use a child, “My son,” in any way that they could? Anything else would be moral relativism, which apparently Senator Santorum regards as a great evil.

Sorry, comments for this entry are closed at this time.